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The Bureau will be closed on Sunday, December 24th Tuesday, December 26th Sunday, December 31st The Bureau is always closed on Mondays.

Sun. Dec 24, 2017

Events

June 11, 2017

Comix Uprisinig: Tyler Cohen, Marguerite Dabaie, Jennifer Camper, and Beldan Sezen

 
Comics reading with slide show. Cartoonists Tyler Cohen, Marguerite Dabaie, Jennifer Camper, and Beldan Sezen read from new work that covers politics, sex, humor, strange ideas, and the riddle of human existence. Q&A and book signing to follow.
 
JenniferCamper_photo
Jennifer Camper is a cartoonist and graphic artist. Her books include “Rude Girls and Dangerous Women” and “subGURLZ”, and she edited two “Juicy Mother” comics anthologies. Her work appears in numerous publications, comic books, and anthologies, and has been exhibited internationally. She is the founding director of the biennial Queers & Comics Conference.
 
 
TylerCohen-selfportrait-900px
Tyler Cohen is a cartoonist who uses autobiography and surrealism to explore gender, parenthood, race, and female experience in her book Primahood: Magenta (Stacked Deck Press). Her work has appeared online at PEN America/PEN Illustrated and MuthaMagazine.com and in print in the Ignatz Award-winning anthology, Qu33r, Alphabet, and The Feminist Utopia Project. Primahood: Magenta is a Finalist for the Bisexual Book Awards.
 
 
marguerite_dabaie
Marguerite Dabaie’s first major comic, The Hookah Girl and Other True Stories–an autobiography about Palestinian-Americans–was awarded two grants. The cultural differences she has felt between Arab and American cultures heavily informs her work. She strives to combine comics with academia, something that dovetailed into her work on A Voyage to Panjikant, a historical-fictional graphic novel about the 7th-century Silk Road (Rosarium Publishing 2018).
 
 
beldansezen

Beldan Sezen is a visual storyteller using various conventions of comics and film. In 2008 her animated cartoon From the Diaries of Two Breasts premiered at the Pink Film Days in Amsterdam. Her short comic A Girl Named Halt was published as a matchbox-book in 2009 and has become a collector’s item. In 2011 she won the Three-in-One Chapbook Contest Prize for her graphic short stories “Fear City,” “Girls,” and “Demons.” Her first graphic-murder mystery, Zakkum, was first installed in a museum space, Frauenmuseum Wiesbaden, as a giant walk-though of the book and was published in 2011 by Treehouse Press, London, and listed for the 2012 Lambda Literary Award. Her first work as a comic reporter, #Gezi Park, was listed for the 2014 Lambda Literary Award. Her second graphic novel, Snapshots of a Girl, was published in 2014 and named to the American Library Asssocation’s Over the Rainbow List for the best LGBT books for adult readers in 2015. She was awarded a 2015 Global Arts Fund Award by the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. Her recent books are represented by Booklyn, and institutional collectors include The New York Public Library, Grinnell College, University of Delaware, Stanford University, and the Library of Congress.
 
 
 
 
 

Start: June 11, 2017 3:00 PM
End: June 11, 2017 5:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @
Phone: 212 620 7310 x300
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: Suggested donation of $10 to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

June 10, 2017

TELL 35: Policing Gender

 

TELL is an evening of story telling from the mouths and minds of queers in NYC hosted by Drae Campbell at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division since February 2014.
 
Policing Gender is the theme of the 35th installment of TELL in conjunction with artist Lorenzo Triburgo’s exhibition of the same name at the Bureau, and will features stories of justice, resistance, love, and friendship from formerly incarcerated LGBTQ folks, prison abolition activists, and queers impacted by “Policing Gender.” Featuring Evie Litwok, Tanya Nguyen, and Charles Whitewolf.
$10 suggested donation to support the Bureau and the performers. No one turned away for lack of funds.

 

Drae Campbell

Drae Campbell is a writer, actor, director, story teller, dancer, and nightlife emcee. Drae has been featured on Late Night with Conan O’Brien and on stages all over NYC. Drae’s directing work has appeared in Iceland, NYC, Budapest and in the San Francisco Fringe Festival. The short film Drae wrote and starred in with Rebecca Drysdale, YOU MOVE ME won the Audience Award for Outstanding Narrative Short at OUTFEST 2010 and has been shown in festivals globally. Drae won the grand prize at the first annual San Miguel De Allende Storytelling Festival in Mexico. She once reigned as Miss LEZ and also got dubbed “the next lezzie comedian on the block” by AfterEllen.com for her comedic stylings on the interwebs. Campbell hosts and curates a monthly queer storytelling show called TELL at BGSQD. Check her out online!  www.draecampbell.com.

 

 

Evie_Litwok

Evie Litwok is the Founder and Director of Witness to Mass Incarceration. Witness is a digital library of first-hand in-depth interviews with formerly incarcerated women and men. America’s 40 year history of mass incarceration is detailed through those who were inside prisons, jails and detention centers.

 

 

Tanya_Nguyen

Tanya Nguyen is a prison abolitionist and a member of Black & Pink. She lives in NYC.

 

 

Charles_Whitewolf

Charles Whitewolf, Joker: Charles has been an actor and joker with TONYC since 2013. They have worked with the Ali Forney Center Troupe, and Concrete Justice. Charles is a poet, skateboarder, and has been featured in video projects by Transparent director Silas Howard.

 
 
 
 

Start: June 10, 2017 7:00 PM
End: June 10, 2017 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: 212 620 7310 ext. 300
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the performers and the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

June 9, 2017

Since I Laid My Burden Down NYC Launch

 

Join author Brontez Purnell for a dynamic reading from his debut novel SINCE I LAID MY BURDEN DOWN with q&a at the best bookstore in town (according to The Feminist Press, but who are we to disagree?), Bureau of General Services-Queer Division! With special guests Joseph Whitt and William Johnson!
 
About Since I Laid My Burden Down:

DeShawn lives a high, creative, and promiscuous life in San Francisco. But when he’s called back to his cramped Alabama hometown for his uncle’s funeral, he’s hit by flashbacks of handsome, doomed neighbors and sweltering Sunday services. Amidst prickly reminders of his childhood, DeShawn ponders family, church, and the men in his life, prompting the question: Who deserves love? A raw, funny, and uninhibited stumble down memory lane, Brontez Purnell’s debut novel explores how one man’s early sexual and artistic escapades grow into a life.

 

“Brontez Purnell is foul-mouthed and evil. Be warned: this book will make you cackle out loud like you’ve got the Devil inside you then it will break your heart. Be careful where you read it. BUT DO READ IT.” —Justin Vivian Bond

 

To reserve a copy of Since I Laid My Burden Down and/or Johnny Would You Love Me If My Dick Were Bigger (just re-issued by The Feminist Press) please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com.

 

Brontez_Purnell
Brontez Purnell is author of Johnny Would You Love Me If My Dick Were Bigger and the cult zine Fag School, frontman for his band the Younger Lovers, and founder and choreographer of the Brontez Purnell Dance Company. He lives in Oakland, California.

 
 
Joseph Whitt is an artist, writer, and independent curator living and working in New York City. He has performed at MoMA PS1, PPOW, Dixon Place, Eyebeam, Deitch Projects, Envoy Enterprises, and other venues of note. His writings have appeared in Art Papers, ArtUS, Useless Magazine, K48; and his work has been reviewed by The New York Times and Sculpture. He has released five chapbooks of poetry and is currently working on a sixth.
 
 
William Johnson is the Program Director for Lambda Literary, an organization dedicated to promoting LGBTQ literature. He is a contributing arts and culture writer for CrushFanazine and the publisher of Mary Literary, a literary journal dedicated to showcasing queer/gay writings of artistic merit.
 

 
 

 

Start: June 9, 2017 7:00 PM
End: June 9, 2017 8:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @
Phone: 212 620 7310 x300
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: Suggested donation of $10 to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

June 8, 2017

Opening Reception: Policing Gender

 

Policing Gender is an installation of photographs and audio created by artist Lorenzo Triburgo. The photographs in Policing Gender are abstract metaphors on absence and imprisonment and the audio component is a compilation of voices of LGBTQ prisoners with whom the artist has been writing on a long-term basis.

Policing Gender will be on view at the Bureau from June 8 through September 10, 2017

 

In Policing Gender, as in his previous body of work Transportraits, Triburgo employs visual connotations of landscape and portrait photography to cast a critical lens on notions of the “Natural” and the politics of queer representation, this time in service of prison abolition as a crucial queer issue.

 

In his art works Lorenzo Triburgo consistently confronts the overlapping ideas of American identity, authenticity, and photography’s critical role in framing and constructing our understanding of identity and reality.

His series, Transportraits, has been exhibited widely in major cities across the United States, Europe and Asia and won first place in the gender category in the international photography competition, the Pride Photo Award in 2012. He was awarded a Project Grant through the Regional Arts and Culture Council of Portland, OR for his current project Policing Gender that examines mass incarceration from a queer perspective. Triburgo exhibits this project at learning institutions throughout the U.S. and hosts workshops regarding the radical, transformative act of becoming a pen pal with community members behind bars.

Triburgo has work in the permanent collection at the Portland Art Museum and has been published and written about in various web and print journals including PDN, Slate, The Huffington Post, and the website for The Transgender Studies Reader 2, edited by Susan Stryker and Aren Aizura, and published by Routledge. He holds a BA from New York University in Photography and Gender Studies and an MFA in Photography and Related Media from the School of Visual Arts. He lives and works in NYC.

 

 

Exhibition-related programs:

 

TELL 35: Policing Gender

Saturday, June 10th, 7—9 PM

TELL is an evening of storytelling from the mouths and minds of queers in NYC hosted by Drae Campbell at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division since February 2014. In conjunction with the exhibition, Policing Gender will serve as the theme of TELL 35. This special edition of TELL will feature stories of justice, resistance, love, and friendship from formerly incarcerated LGBTQ folks, prison abolition activists, and queers impacted by “policing gender.”

 

Envisioning Our Future

Thursday, September 7th, 6:30—8:30 PM

A panel of experts from a spectrum of perspectives will discuss prison abolition as a political imperative to LGBTQ activism. Panelists will discuss immediate and future abolitionist goals, tangible strategies for resistance, and hope in the vision of a different future.  

 

 

 

 

Start: June 8, 2017 6:00 PM
End: June 8, 2017 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @
Phone: 212 620 7310 x300
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States

June 7, 2017

In Talks: Queering Mainstream Media & Creating Art That Matters

 
 
Sawyer DeVuyst, Lia Clay, & Sean Santiago will be presenting their work in a series of artist talks, followed by a discussion about queering mainstream media and continuing to make art that matters during this volatile time in history.
 
Between these three artist, they’ve worked with some heavy-hitting names in fashion, publishing and advertising: Teen Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Barney’s, Thinx, Out Magazine, Candy Magazine, New York Times, MiLK Makeup and HBO Vice.
 
What is it like to work with such major companies as an out trans person? What can be done to open up the playing field for more trans and gender non-conforming folks to do similar work? Join us Thursday, June 7 at 7pm for a great night of stories of lived personal experiences of these trans and genderqueer media makers followed by a Q&A.
 
 
Sean Santiago is a photographer, writer and stylist whose work parses gender through the lenses of style and beauty. The founder of Cakeboy, he can be found in various corners of the internet stanning for Kristen Stewart and sharing way too many selfies. Follow his work at @sean_santiago.
 
 
Lia Clay is a transgender portrait and fashion photographer, currently working in New York City. Her work focuses on intersectionality, and portraying trans stories from a trans perspective. Lia’s work presents deeply saturated images with an abandonment of retouching, portraying raw portraiture of peers, ex lovers, and personal muses. Follow her work at @liaclay.
 
 
Sawyer DeVuyst is a visual artist, model and actor whose work aspires to empower and humanize otherized communities through visibility and storytelling. You may have seen his work for Thinx in the NYC subway or San Francisco BART, in a music video for A Great Big World, on HBO Vice, for Barney’s, in the Wythe Hotel or daily on instagram as @sawyermine. 
 
 
 

Start: June 7, 2017 7:00 PM
End: June 7, 2017 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @
Phone: 212 620 7310 x300
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: Suggested donation of $10 to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.