Our Next Event

Affirmative Laughter

Affirmative Laughter May

  Come celebrate Elsa Waithe‘s 30th bday the only way she know how… WITH LAUGHTER!!! On May 25th @ 7pm, Bureau of General Services-Queer Division is gonna be packed as we ring in Elsa’s new decade with this hot lineup:   Beth Maria Margo Reiss Shelly Colman Sarah Hartshorne Norah Yahya Mamoudou N’Diaye   $10 [...]

Fri. May 25, 2018 7:00 PM

Events

April 12, 2018

An Evening at The Mudd Club with Richard Boch

 
Richard Boch, the author, is an artist who was the doorman of the legendary, New York City club. The place was more than just a venue for bands, it was a true ‘club’ for artists of all disciplines, and the relationships and collaborations made then still bear fruit today. Though it lasted only from 1978 to 1983, its influence is pervasive-it was, essentially, the birthplace of the Eighties.
 
Keith Haring was in charge of the ‘gallery.’ Anna Sui debuted her designs there. The Talking Heads, and other seminal no wave/new wave bands found their start at the Mudd Club.
 
Fab Five Freddy (Fred Braithwaite) said this about Richard and The Mudd Club: “More than the well-known doorman of the Mudd Club, Richard Boch played a pivotal role in why it was the coolest club in the world back then. Richard was the crowd curator, carefully only letting in the right mix of the wildly creative downtown movers and shakers who made it our hangout, leaving the squares and the unhip outside in the cold. Richard is now letting everyone into the Mudd Club by way of this well-written book that details the who’s who and all the fun we had while infiltrating, changing and disrupting pop culture.”
 

The Mudd Club is filled with anecdotes about and memories of coming to terms with sexuality, drugs, and how one becomes an artist in a time and place that is overripe with creative energy. Richard’s stories are personal yet are populated by the now famous (and infamous) denizens of New York’s artistic community.
 

Richard Boch will be introduced by Marc Jacobs.
 

Copies of The Mudd Club are available for purchase at the Bureau. To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!
 

Author photograph by Kate Simon.
 

Recent pieces about The Mudd Club:
 

NY Times- “A vivid tell-all” 
 

Dazed & Confused
 

Bust Magazine- “The Mudd Club comes to life in a fascinating tell-all memoir.”
 

Merry Jane Magazine- “The book is a thing of wonder — funny, ferocious, masterfully written and assembled.” 
 
 

Richard Boch is an artist, writer and lifelong New Yorker. He was born in Brooklyn, grew up on Long Island and studied printmaking and painting at The University of Connecticut and the Parsons New School for Design.
 

In 2016 Boch narrated a slide presentation at HOWL Projects related to the New York club scene. Recent exhibitions of his work include a group show at McDaris Fine Art, a suite of multimedia prints titled A Throwback Thrown Forward, and a series of “Page Paintings” as part of No Wave Heroes. He was interviewed and quoted at length for High On Rebellion, the story of Max’s Kansas City by Yvonne Sewall ­Ruskin, New York in The 70s by Allan Tannenbaum, Edgewise: A Picture of Cookie Mueller by Chloé Griffin, Born This Way, the story of Gia Carrangi by Sacha Lanvin Baumann and Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor by Tim Lawrence. In addition Boch is currently editing Bobby Grossman’s Low Fidelity: Still Photographs 1975­ – 1983 and recently contributed a sidebar to Tannenbaum’s Grit and Glamour. In November 2015 he served on the host committee of the Mudd Club Rummage Sale Benefitting the Bowery Mission, the first Mudd-­related event in over thirty years. The New York Times referred to Boch as making “live or die decisions” as the club’s “longtime alpha doorman.”
 

 

 

 

 

Start: April 12, 2018 7:00 PM
End: April 12, 2018 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 7, 2018

Book Launch: Martin Duberman’s The Rest of It: Hustlers, Cocaine, Depression, and Then Some, 1976–1988, with Larry Mass

 

Join us for the launch of Martin Duberman’s The Rest of It: Hustlers, Cocaine, Depression, and Then Some, 1976–1988 (Duke University Press, March 2018). Following Duberman’s reading, he will be joined in conversation by Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) co-founder Larry Mass.
 
Copies of The Rest of It  will be available for purchase at the Bureau. To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!
 
For many, the death of a parent marks a low point in their personal lives. For Martin Duberman—a major historian and a founding figure in the history of gay and lesbian studies—the death of his mother was just the beginning of what became a twelve-year period filled with despair, drug addiction, and debauchery. From his cocaine use, massive heart attack, and immersion into New York’s gay hustler scene to experiencing near-suicidal depression and attending rehab, The Rest of It is the previously untold and revealing story of how Duberman managed to survive his turbulent personal life while still playing leading roles in the gay community and the academy.
 
Despite the hardships, Duberman managed to be incredibly productive: he wrote his biography of Paul Robeson, rededicated himself to teaching, wrote plays, and coedited the prize-winning Hidden from History. His exploration of new paths of scholarship culminated in his founding of the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies, thereby inaugurating a new academic discipline. At the outset of the HIV/AIDS epidemic Duberman increased his political activism, and in these pages he also describes the tensions between the New Left and gay organizers, as well as the profound homophobia that created the conditions for queer radical activism. Filled with gossip, featuring cameo appearances by luminaries such as Gore Vidal, Norman Mailer, Vivian Gornick, Susan Brownmiller, Kate Millett, and Néstor Almendros, among many others, and most importantly, written with an unflinching and fearless honesty, The Rest of It provides scathing insights into a troubling decade of both personal and political history. It is a stimulating look into a key period of Duberman’s life, which until now had been too painful to share.
 
 
To read Larry Mass’s review of The Rest of It click here.
 
 
Martin Duberman is Distinguished Professor of History, Emeritus, at City University of New York, where he founded and directed the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies. He is the author of numerous histories, biographies, memoirs, essays, plays, and novels, which include Cures: A Gay Man’s Odyssey; Paul Robeson; Stonewall; Midlife Queer: Autobiography of a Decade, 1971–1981; Black Mountain: An Exploration in Community; The Worlds of Lincoln Kirstein; Jews/Queers/Germans; and more than a dozen others. His biography of Charles Francis Adams won the Bancroft Prize, and his coedited anthology Hidden from History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past won two Lambda Literary Awards. He won a third Lambda Award for Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, and the Battlefield of AIDS. Duberman received the 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Historical Association, as well as two honorary degrees: Doctor of Humane Letters from Amherst College, and Doctor of Letters from Columbia University. He was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. Duberman lives in New York City.

 
 
Lawrence D. Mass, M.D., wrote the first press reports on AIDS and is a co-founder of Gay Men’s Health Crisis. He is the author-editor of Dialogues of The Sexual Revolution, Volumes I and 2; We Must Love One Another or Die: The Life and Legacies of Larry Kramer; and a memoir, Confessions of a Jewish Wagnerite: Being Gay and Jewish in America. His reviews and essays, and sequences of On the Future of Wagnerism, his in-progress sequel to Confessions, have appeared on Huffington Post.
 
 
 
 

Start: April 7, 2018 7:00 PM
End: April 7, 2018 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 6, 2018

Author Reading: Richard A. McKay’s Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic, with Sarah Schulman

 

Please join Richard A. McKay, author of Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic, for a reading, followed by a conversation led by Sarah Schulman.

 

The search for a “Patient Zero”—popularly understood to be an epidemic’s first infected case—has been key to media coverage of major infectious disease outbreaks for more than three decades. Yet the term itself did not exist before the emergence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. How did this idea so swiftly exert a strong grip on the popular consciousness? In Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic, Richard A. McKay demonstrates how this seemingly new concept drew upon centuries-old ideas—and fears—about contagion and social disorder.

 

McKay presents a carefully documented account of the life of Gaétan Dugas, a gay man whose skin cancer diagnosis in 1980 took on very different meanings as the epidemic developed and who gained widespread posthumous infamy when he was incorrectly identified as Patient Zero of the North American outbreak. McKay shows how public health investigators inadvertently created the term amid their early research into the emerging health crisis; how an ambitious journalist dramatically amplified the idea in his determination to reframe national debates about AIDS; and how many individuals grappled with the notion of Patient Zero—adopting, challenging, and redirecting its powerful meanings—as they tried to make sense of and respond to the first fifteen years of an unfolding epidemic in Canada and the United States. With important insights for our interconnected age, Patient Zero untangles the complex process by which individuals and groups create meaning and allocate blame when faced with new disease threats.

 

Copies of Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic are available for purchase at the Bureau. To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!

 

Originally from Vancouver, Canada, Richard A. McKay is a Wellcome Trust Research Fellow in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. His research has been published in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine and in Nature, and he is currently investigating the pre-AIDS history of sexual health and illness among gay men, other men who have sex with men, and trans people (https://www.beforehiv.hps.cam.ac.uk/share). Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic is his first book and has been nominated for the Publishing Triangle’s Randy Shilts Award for Gay Nonfiction. He lives in London, where he also works as a coach for academics, writers, and other creative thinkers.

 

Sarah Schulman’s work spans novels, plays, journalism, and nonfiction. She is a Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at the College of Staten Island. Some of her recent works include the movie United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, and the nonfiction work Conflict is not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility and the Duty of Repair. Her 19th book, Maggie Terry, a novel of murder and intrigues, will be published in September, 2018 by The Feminist Press. This year she was awarded the Publishing Triangle’s Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Start: April 6, 2018 7:00 PM
End: April 6, 2018 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 1, 2018

NYC Queer Comic Fair 2018

 

What is it: The NYC Queer Comic Fair the only fair in NYC geared entirely towards queer sequential art (comics, graphic novels, illustrated stories, photo-comics, or any other interesting take on the medium of still-visual narrative storytelling). The event is organized by WabiSabiZinez and Carmine Street Comics and hosted by the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division . This year we are expanding to a two day event!

When is it: The event will be hosted by the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division on Saturday, March 31st and Sunday, April 1st from 1-7pm each day.
Organizers:

Vendors:

 

 

 

 

 

Start: April 1, 2018 1:00 PM
End: April 1, 2018 7:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States

March 31, 2018

NYC Queer Comic Fair 2018

 

What is it: The NYC Queer Comic Fair the only fair in NYC geared entirely towards queer sequential art (comics, graphic novels, illustrated stories, photo-comics, or any other interesting take on the medium of still-visual narrative storytelling). The event is organized by WabiSabiZinez and Carmine Street Comics and hosted by the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division . This year we are expanding to a two day event!

When is it: The event will be hosted by the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division on Saturday, March 31st and Sunday, April 1st from 1-7pm each day.
Organizers:

Vendors:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start: March 31, 2018 1:00 PM
End: March 31, 2018 7:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division @ The Center
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States