Events

May 3, 2018

Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing that Occurs

 

Please join us Thursday, May 3 to celebrate Lyle Ashton Harris’ monograph Today I Shall Judge Nothing that Occurs with an evening of conversation with Lyle Ashton Harris, Thomas Allen Harris, and Alex Fialho.

 

Throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, a radical cultural scene emerged across the globe, finding expression in the galleries, nightclubs, and bedrooms of New York, London, Los Angeles, and Rome. In Lyle Ashton Harris: Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs, the artist’s archive of 35mm Ektachrome images are presented alongside journal entries and recollections by additional contributors coalescing in a presentation of what Harris has described as “ephemeral moments and emblematic figures… against a backdrop of seismic shifts in the art world, the emergence of multiculturalism, the second wave of AIDS activism, and incipient globalization.” The Ektachrome Archive “constructs collective and private narratives to comment on identity, desire, sexuality, and loss” and was included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial.
 

Copies of Today I Shall Judge Nothing that Occurs (Aperture Foundation, 2017) are available for purchase at the Bureau. To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!

 

 

For more than two decades Lyle Ashton Harris has cultivated a diverse artistic practice ranging from photographic media, collage, installation and performance. His work explores intersections between the personal and the political, examining the impact of ethnicity, gender and desire on the contemporary social and cultural dynamic. Known for his self-portraits and use of pop culture icons (such as Billie Holiday and Michael Jackson), Harris teases the viewers’ perceptions and expectations, resignifying cultural cursors and recalibrating the familiar with the extraordinary. Harris has exhibited work widely, including at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (New York) and The Whitney Museum of American Art (New York) among many others, as well as at international biennials (São Paulo, 2016; Busan, 2008; Venice, 2007; Seville, 2006; Gwangju, 2000). His work is represented in the permanent collections of major museums, most recently The Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 2014 Harris joined the Board of Trustees of the American Academy in Rome and was recipient of the David C. Driskell Prize by the High Museum of Art (Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.). In 2016 he was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and was appointed a trustee of the Tiffany Foundation. Having studied at Wesleyan University, the California Institute of the Arts, and the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program, Harris is currently an Associate Professor of Art and Art Education at New York University.
 

 

Born in the Bronx and raised in New York City and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Thomas Allen Harris began his career as a photographer before producing for public television, for which he received several awards including two Emmy nominations (in 1991) for his work as a staff producer at WNET (New York’s PBS affiliate) on THE ELEVENTH HOUR. Harris is a recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including a 2015 NAACP Image Award, United States Artist Award, Guggenheim Fellowship, Rockefeller Fellowship, A Blade of Grass Fellow as well as a Tribeca Film Institute’s Nelson Mandela Award. Harris has taught, written and lectured widely on media.<
Harris is the founder and President of Chimpanzee Productions, a company dedicated to producing unique audio-visual experiences that illuminate the Human Condition and the search for identity, family, and spirituality. Chimpanzee’s innovative and award-winning films have received critical acclaim at International film festivals such as Sundance, Berlin, Toronto, FESPACO, Outfest, Flaherty and Cape Town and have been broadcast on PBS, the Sundance Channel, ARTE, as well as CBC, Swedish Broadcasting Network and New Zealand Television. In addition, Harris’ videos and installations have been featured at museums and galleries including the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Biennial, Corcoran Gallery, Reina Sophia, London Institute of the Arts and the Gwangju Biennale. He has held positions as Associate Professor of Media Arts at the University of California San Diego, and Visiting Professor of Film and New Media at Sarah Lawrence College.
 

 

Alex Fialho is a curator and arts writer based in New York City. He is a frequent contributor to Artforum, and Programs Director at Visual AIDS, where he facilitates projects around both the history and immediacy of the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic, with particular stakes intervening against recent widespread whitewashing of HIV/AIDS cultural narratives.
Fialho has worked closely with Lyle Ashton Harris and Thomas Allen Harris in multiple capacities. In the context of Visual AIDS’ Day With(out) Art programs, Fialho collaborated to commission new short videos from the artists: Lyle Ashton Harris’ Selections from the Ektachrome Archive was featured in Day With(out) Art 2014 ALTERNATE ENDINGS and Thomas Allen Harris’ About Face: The Evolution of a Black Producer was featured in Day With(out) Art 2017 ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS, curated by Erin Christovale and Vivian Crockett. Fialho’s 6 hour oral history with Lyle Ashton Harris will be included in the Smithsonian Archives of American Art’s “Visual Art & The AIDS Epidemic Oral History Project” and Fialho covered Lyle Ashton Harris’ Today I Shall Judge Nothing That Occurs: Selections from the Eckachrome Archive for Bookforum. Lyle Ashton Harris and Thomas Allen Harris will be honored alongside Steed Taylor with the Visual AIDS Vanguard Award on May 21, 2018.

 

 

 

 

Start: May 3, 2018 6:30 PM
End: May 3, 2018 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

May 2, 2018

OLNY Poly Movie Night: Professor Marston and the Wonder Women

 

Open Love NY presents Poly Movie Night, a FREE series of feature films that focus on the portrayal of consensual / ethical non-monogamy in cinema. This month we’ll be at our regular venue, the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, and celebrating 2 years of Poly Movie Night!
 
Please join us for Professor Marston and the Wonder Women (2017), written and directed by Angela Robinson and starring Luke Evans, Rebecca Hall, and Bella Heathcote. The movie was widely praised as one of the most positive portrayals of polyamory in modern American film to date.
 
Wednesday, May 2 – 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
208 W 13th St, Rm 210
New York, NY 10011
 
We’ll meet at 6:30 pm at the Bureau (in room 210 of The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center at 208 West 13th Street) for pre-screening socializing and start the movie at 7 pm. The more people come, the more likely we’ll continue the event! The event is free, although a $10 suggested donation to help fund future events is much appreciated.
 
Synopsis: Based on the true story of the creator of the character Wonder Woman, Harvard psychologist Dr. William Marston’s polyamorous relationship with his wife and their lover was more provocative than any adventure he had ever written. Running time: 1 hour 48 minutes.

 

 

 

 

Start: May 2, 2018 6:30 PM
End: May 2, 2018 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Phone: 646-358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: Suggested donation of $10 to benefit the Bureau and Open Love New York. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 29, 2018

Beautiful to Look At But Painful to Touch: Marco DaSilva in conversation with Travis Chamberlain

 
Join Marco DaSilva for an intimate conversation about his artistic process with Travis Chamberlain, Managing Director at Queer|Art, where DaSilva is a fellow in QUEER|ART|MENTORSHIP for 2017-2018. DaSilva’s paintings, collages, and sculptures are currently on view in No Reason To Be Careful through June 10th at the Bureau of General Services – Queer Division. This program is free and open to the public.
 
 
Marco DaSilva pic

Marco DaSilva is a native New Yorker whose symbol-based paintings explore hybridity through the intersections of his Brazilian-American, queer identity and manic experience. He has exhibited work at IMAGE Gallery, Heath Gallery, and the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art. He is also a NYFA Artist as Entrepreneur Fellow. He creates work at his studio in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Marco has a BFA in Painting and Drawing from SUNY New Paltz.
 
 
Travis Chamberlain is a curator whose work encompasses performances, residencies, exhibitions, and community organizing, with a focus on the excavation of marginalized cultural histories and the advancement of emerging queer voices. Major projects have included work with artists Ishmael Houston-Jones, Dennis Cooper, Karen Finley, Julie Tolentino, Wu Tsang, Jack Ferver, Tina Satter, Young Jean Lee, and Jennifer Monson, among others. Formerly Associate Curator of Performance at the New Museum and Artistic Director of Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, Chamberlain is now Managing Director at Queer|Art, a New York-based non-profit that supports the creative and professional development of LGBTQ artists through models of mentorship and community exchange.

 
 
 
 

Start: April 29, 2018 3:00 PM
End: April 29, 2018 4:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 28, 2018

Cuarenta y Nueve book launch celebration in New York!

 

Cuarenta y Nueve‘s 3rd and final book launch party is in New York City. Please join us to celebrate this beautiful coffee table book dedicated to the 49 lives lost in the Orlando Pulse nightclub massacre. Many of the 49 artistic contributors will attend. Readings, book signings, performers + celebrating the love and light of our rainbow community. Please join us on this ‘pride full’ occasion!

Cuarenta y Nueve means 49 in Spanish. This beautiful coffee table book is an artistic homage to the 49 lives lost on June 12, 2016, at the Pulse Nightclub massacre, in Orlando Florida. Writers of every discipline & genre, photographers, artists, and even an Executive Chef have come together to create this must have tribute. By 49 and for 49, Cuarenta y Nueve was the vision of (and curated by) best selling author Joie Lamar, who has also arranged for 100% of the proceeds to be donated to positive LGBTQ+ organizations, specifically Pride School Atlanta & GLAAD.

 

 

Start: April 28, 2018 7:00 PM
End: April 28, 2018 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

April 26, 2018

Pauline Gloss: Lullabies for the Psychotic and Other Recent Work

 
Literary sound-artist Pauline Gloss will present an evening of new and recent work in the text-sound / sound-poetry tradition. She will present her new cycle for solo voice, “Lullabies for the Psychotic” and screen her record (with accompanying video from Nicolas Bermeo) “Greetings from Here: Audio Postcards in Transition,” from 2016.
 
Pauline’s current body of work is concerned with how the smallest bits of language— in both their sonic and meaning-making dimensions— can, through repetition, variation, and syntactical rewiring, create temporary sonic and semantic meaning-making structures.
 
Her work investigates and foregrounds the physicality of language by rendering it architecturally. She makes of its discreet bits semantic and sonic building-blocks whose stability is always already in question.

 
With the character and reach of this tool set, she attempts to form a language in which the boundaries and traditional formations of selfhood are plied, questioned, and reformed.
 
 
Pauline Gloss is a writer and literary sound-artist based in Los Angeles. Her language-sound work attempts to dramatize and expand language in its timbral, rhythmic, textural, and meaning-making dimensions.
 
She runs Spoken Records, a label specializing in the release of work in the Text-Sound tradition. She has been written about favorably in art and music publications and has performed or had work shown in Los Angeles, London, and New York at institutions including MoCA Geffen, Cal Arts, Human Resources (LA), Resonance FM (London), Poetic Research Bureau, The Lambda Literary Festival, Automata, Betalevel, and others.
 
 
 
 
 

Start: April 26, 2018 7:00 PM
End: April 26, 2018 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Phone: (646) 358-1730
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.