Our Next Event

Leather Art Retrospective

MCExcelsior

  The brothers of Excelsior M.C. invite you to the opening reception of a gallery style exhibition showcasing some of the most famous artwork and photos taken over the past 45 years held at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, in room 210 of The LGBT Community Center. Proceeds benefit New Alternatives for LGBT Homeless Youth. [...]

Fri. Jan 24, 2020 7:00 PM

Events

January 24, 2020

Leather Art Retrospective

 

The brothers of Excelsior M.C. invite you to the opening reception of a gallery style exhibition showcasing some of the most famous artwork and photos taken over the past 45 years held at the Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, in room 210 of The LGBT Community Center. Proceeds benefit New Alternatives for LGBT Homeless Youth. Ticket includes:

  • Event access
  • Complimentary admission to the Eagle NYC until 11pm
  • Complimentary drink ticket to The Cubbyhole
  • Variety of random prize drawings

 

$15 admission

Purchase tickets here.

 

New Alternatives increases the self-sufficiency of LGBTQ+ homeless youth and young adults by enabling them to transition out of the shelter system to stable adult lives. They do this by providing long-term support, weekly case management, education services, life skills training, community-building recreational activities, opportunities for self-expression, and programs for HIV+ youth. New Alternatives’ guiding principles are those of harm reduction, youth development, and empowerment.

 

MC Excelsior’s Leather Art Retrospective will remain on view at the Bureau from January 24 through February 9, 2020.

 

 

 

 

Start: January 24, 2020 7:00 PM
End: January 24, 2020 10:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $15

January 28, 2020

Poems Are Not a Luxury: Audre Lorde and Adrienne Rich

 

The Bureau is excited to partner again with the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research to bring you:

Poems Are Not a Luxury: Audre Lorde and Adrienne Rich

Instructor: Amy Schiller

“Poetry is liberative language,” wrote Adrienne Rich. “Poems are not a luxury,” argued Audre Lorde. How can we understand these claims about the intersection of poetry and politics? This course delves into the lives and works of Rich and Lorde, as we explore their respective poetic oeuvres. To Rich and Lorde, liberation was a through-line of experience between eros, politics, and language. And both express in their works understandings of gender, sexuality, and the body. In a famous interview between the two writers, they discuss poetry as the language of the dark, the feminine, the unconscious; we will explore this tendency in their work and the ways in which their respective renderings of the feminine influenced the trajectory of feminist theory and politics in the mid and late-20th century. Their conversations with one another, and treatments of their legacies by Claudia Rankine, Lisa L. Moore, Marilyn Hacker and others, will inform our investigation of poetry as part of feminist theory. How do Rich and Lorde navigate antiracism and intersectionality among allies with different race and class affiliations? How does poetic form contribute to their political practice? Readings will include Diving Into The Wreck, The Fact of a Doorframe, Uses of the Erotic, Sister Outsider, and the Arts of the Possible, among others.

 

The Bureau sells copies of

Adrienne Rich’s Diving Into The Wreck and Arts of the Possible,

Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider, which includes the essay “Uses of the Erotic,”

and other titles by both Lorde and Rich. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us! Thank you!

 

Course Schedule

January 28, February 4, 11, and 18, 2020
Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30pm
4 sessions

$315.00*

Registration is required. Please click here.

 

*Three scholarship spaces are reserved in each course because we realize that not everyone can afford to pay the full fee for our courses. Students who cannot pay the full fee should email us at info@thebrooklyninstitute.com to learn about our scholarship options. We will not ask questions about your financial situation but we do ask that you use the system in good faith and consider the needs of other students and faculty members.

 

The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division is an independent, all-volunteer queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space hosted by The LGBT Community Center in Manhattan.

 

The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research is an organization of young scholars in New York City, founded in November 2011 by a few then-graduate students at Columbia University with a shared interest in pedagogy and genuinely interdisciplinary conversation. We teach classes all over the city, record a regular podcast, run a digital humanities initiative to preserve rare and out-of-print academic texts, and in general work frantically at any given time on a broad range of other academic and para-academic projects. We are a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.

 

 

 

Start: January 28, 2020 6:30 PM
End: January 28, 2020 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $315 for four-week course (see description)

January 30, 2020

Open enchanting historical closets with three NY novelists

 

Author readings, with slides and videos; Q & A. Explore enchanting historical closets through the eyes of three local award-winning novelists Loretta Goldberg, Joshua Ian, & Christina Britton Conroy!

 

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Australian-American Loretta Goldberg is an accomplished pianist with nine commercial CDs to her credit, a former financial advisor and now a published author. Her debut novel, The Reversible Mask, recounts the exploits of a sixteenth century bisexual spy, Edward Latham, and his work as a double agent for Queen Elizabeth I. Intrigue, lust, war, and betrayal fill its pages https://www.facebook.com/LorettaGoldbergAuthor.

 

 

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Joshua Ian writes mostly historical and speculative fiction, all with a queer bent. The Harvest Moon is the first in his Darkly Enchanted Romance series, which takes inspiration from mythology, fairy tales, folklore, and legend. Witches, ghosts, and mythical creatures – you never know what you might fall in love with. Find his steampunk collection and upcoming works at https://www.moodyboxfan.com/ or on social @joshuaianauthor.

 

 

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Novelist/ screenwriter/ singer/ actor/ Irish harpist/ Licensed Creative Arts Therapist, Christina Britton Conroy has many passions. Her 4-book Victorian novel series His Majesty’s Theatre is filled with the history of the British theatre and allusions to Shakespeare. Her characters are gay, straight, rich, poor, educated and illiterate. Professional rivalries, jilted lovers, and finally a murder bring them all together under one roof: His Majesty’s Theatre.  https://www.facebook.com/ChrisBritConroy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start: January 30, 2020 7:00 PM
End: January 30, 2020 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.

February 1, 2020

Oral History: A Queer Art: A Two-Day Workshop

 

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL. PLEASE SIGN UP FOR THE WAITLIST, AND WE WILL BE IN TOUCH IF SPACE OPENS UP.

Oral History, a Queer Art will follow the course of our usual immersive workshops by offering foundational oral history training–theory, method, practice– while inviting exploration into the way that oral history values and theory are arguably queer and/or well-positioned to support emergent complex queer narratives. This workshop will also seize upon the history and abundance of queer oral history projects, approaching this canon as both case study of “insider history” and as inspiration for future projects. We’ll challenge a purist oral history model, asking how it can/should be adapted with queer values and theory in mind.

This workshop is appropriate for those looking for foundation oral history training, those embarking (or currently working) on queer oral history projects and/or those who wish to learn in a queer-centered space. All are welcome.

 

More about Oral History Summer School: Our workshops are set up to bring together learners with a range of experience and motives, to think about how oral history’s best practices apple to their work and personal lives. We emphasize listening, collaboration, co-creation, ethics, trauma training, self-care, familiarity with archival practices and project design, though not all of these subjects will be covered at length in shorter (1 to 2-day) workshops.

 

Start: February 1, 2020 9:30 AM
End: February 1, 2020 3:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: Registration required--see description

Oral History, A Queer Art: NYC Trans Oral History Project: Public Event

 

4 PM to 5:30 PM (Doors open at 3:45 PM)
Free and open to the public

Please join us as Michelle Esther O’Brien and Nico Fuentes present their work with the NYC Trans Oral History Project (NYC TOHP) in conversation with Suzanne Snider and the audience.

NYC TOHP is a public, online community archive devoted to the collection, preservation and sharing of trans histories, organized in collaboration with the New York Public Library. The NYC TOHP works to confront the erasure of trans lives and to record diverse histories of gender as intersecting with race and racism, poverty, dis/ability, aging, housing migration, sexism, and the AIDS crisis.

During the event, Fuentes and O’Brien will discuss some of the most challenging lessons related to the NYC Trans Oral History Project and the broader implications for rethinking best practices in oral history. This talk will address the Project’s and Collective’s emergent ideas around ownership, vulnerability, accessibility, fetishization of orality/aurality, compensation, mission-driven work and collective liberation.

 

Presenters:

Michelle Esther O’Brien is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at New York University. She is currently conducting dissertation research on LGBTQ social movements in New York City. Michelle also works as a Community Oral History Coordinator at the New York Public Library, where she helps lead the New York City Trans Oral History Project. The Project is gathering a growing online archive of personal oral histories from trans New Yorkers. Michelle received her Masters of Social Work from the Hunter College School of Social Work, CUNY (now Silberman School). She spent several years working in HIV/AIDS service agencies, as a community organizer, support group facilitator and case worker. She served as the Executive Director of Housing Here and Now, at the time the leading coalition of tenant rights organizations in New York City.

Nico Fuentes is a rank and file organizer, sex shop worker, listener and sometimes speaker. She is interested in trans political organizing, difference, and bridging class and identity politics. She most recently completed a two year contract campaign at the Pleasure Chest NY and is looking forward to continuing to work with the New York Trans Oral History Project as an interviewer.

Suzanne Snider is a writer, documentarian, and educator whose work is deeply influenced by oral history theory and practice. Her most recent projects have taken the shape of sound installation, essays, and archive design. In 2012, she founded Oral History Summer School, an interdisciplinary training program in upstate New York. She consults frequently for institutions and project teams; collaborations include the National Public Housing Museum, MoMA, Center for Reproductive Rights and the National Library of Kosovo. Her writing/audio work appear in The Guardian, The Believer and The Washington Post, along with several anthologies and artist catalogs. Snider teaches at The New School. With support from the Yaddo Corporation and the MacDowell Colony, she is completing her first book, The Revival.

 

 

 

Start: February 1, 2020 4:00 PM
End: February 1, 2020 5:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States