Our Next Event

The Vagina Bible Talk and Book Signing

Vagina Bible 500 copy

  The Bureau is excited to host an evening of conversation bringing together Dr. Jen Gunter, author of The Vagina Bible (Kensington, 2019), and Amber Gavin of Abortion Access Front. Dr. Gunter is a “fact evangelist in the fake-news era” (The Cut) and with Ms. Gavin they will discuss language, propaganda, and misinformation in medicine. Copies [...]

Wed. Aug 28, 2019 7:00 PM

Events

August 28, 2019

The Vagina Bible Talk and Book Signing

 

The Bureau is excited to host an evening of conversation bringing together Dr. Jen Gunter, author of The Vagina Bible (Kensington, 2019), and Amber Gavin of Abortion Access Front.

Dr. Gunter is a “fact evangelist in the fake-news era” (The Cut) and with Ms. Gavin they will discuss language, propaganda, and misinformation in medicine.

Copies of The Vagina Bible will be available for purchase at the Bureau.

To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!

 

Check out this July 25 profile of Dr. Jen Gunter in The Cut!

Jen Gunter, Photo Credit Jason LeCras

Jen Gunter, Photo Credit Jason LeCras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jen Gunter is an obstetrician and gynecologist with nearly three decades of experience as a vulvar and vaginal diseases expert. She writes a regular column on women’s health for The New York Times called The Cycle, as well as a weekly Q&A, You Asked, which addresses women’s most press questions about their bodies. She has been called Twitter’s resident gynecologist, the Internet’s OB/GYN, and one of the fiercest advocate’s for women’s health.

 

 

corporate headshot award winner female

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber Gavin is Director of Programs for Abortion Access Front (formerly Lady Parts Justice). In that role, she leads the organization’s clinic outreach programs and she works to make every independent abortion clinic feel loved and supported by their local community for the tremendous care they provide. Amber proudly served on the Abortion Care Network’s 2019 Annual Conference and Gala Planning Committee.

 

 

 

 

 

Start: August 28, 2019 7:00 PM
End: August 28, 2019 8:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States

September 10, 2019

Reading the Iliad

 

The Bureau is excited to partner with the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research to bring you:

Reading the Iliad

Instructors: Bruce King, Laura Slatkin
The Iliad stands at the start of most histories of western literature, even as it remains enduringly strange—often, it seems, at odds with the very tradition it has been taken to inaugurate. In this course, we will read closely the entirety of Homer’s “poem of force,” attempting to recapture both some of its strangeness and its continued relevance. We’ll focus, too, on the following themes: the hero and his commemoration; the relations of men and women, of men and men, of humans, gods, and animals; exile and rebellion; violence and the making of epic art; the recompenses and failures of culture itself. How did an oral tradition of heroic poetry, enacted by singing bards for hundreds of years, coalesce into the written Iliad that we now know? How do the struggles of the Iliadic hero illuminate both consciousness itself and the borders of culture? How does the poem both commemorate and critique its own heroes? How might the struggle over the city of Troy illuminate our own national propensities toward war without end?

One of the strangest elements of the Iliad is its depiction of Achilles, who marks out a queer distance from the norms of heroic culture. Standing at the turbulent center of the poem, amidst great violence, deceit, and godly meddling, is Achilles’ love for his companion Patroclus. In Reading the Iliad, we’ll ask, among other questions: how are we to understand the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus? What, in the poem and in Homeric Greek culture, is the boundary between the homosocial and the homoerotic? What links eros and destruction? What, in reading the Iliad, is the content of a queer critique?

Our primary focus will be on the Iliad itself, but we will also take up a few key texts in Iliadic criticism: Plato, Aristotle, Milman Parry and Albert Lord, and Simone Weil.

 

Course Schedule
Tuesday, 6:30-9:30pm
September 10 — October 01, 2019
4 weeks

$315.00*

Registration is required. Please click here.

*Three scholarship spaces are reserved in each course because we realize that not everyone can afford to pay the full fee for our courses. Students who cannot pay the full fee should email us at info@thebrooklyninstitute.com to learn about our scholarship options. We will not ask questions about your financial situation but we do ask that you use the system in good faith and consider the needs of other students and faculty members.

 

Image: Exekias, Achilles and Ajax Playing a Board Game, 540-530 BCE, Detail of Terracotta amphora, Height 2 feet. Musei Vaticani, Rome.

 

The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division is an independent, all-volunteer queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space hosted by The LGBT Community Center in Manhattan.

The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research is an organization of young scholars in New York City, founded in November 2011 by a few then-graduate students at Columbia University with a shared interest in pedagogy and genuinely interdisciplinary conversation. We teach classes all over the city, record a regular podcast, run a digital humanities initiative to preserve rare and out-of-print academic texts, and in general work frantically at any given time on a broad range of other academic and para-academic projects. We are a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.

 

Start: September 10, 2019 6:30 PM
End: September 10, 2019 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $315 for four-week course (see description)

September 17, 2019

Reading the Iliad

 

The Bureau is excited to partner with the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research to bring you:

Reading the Iliad

Instructors: Bruce King, Laura Slatkin
The Iliad stands at the start of most histories of western literature, even as it remains enduringly strange—often, it seems, at odds with the very tradition it has been taken to inaugurate. In this course, we will read closely the entirety of Homer’s “poem of force,” attempting to recapture both some of its strangeness and its continued relevance. We’ll focus, too, on the following themes: the hero and his commemoration; the relations of men and women, of men and men, of humans, gods, and animals; exile and rebellion; violence and the making of epic art; the recompenses and failures of culture itself. How did an oral tradition of heroic poetry, enacted by singing bards for hundreds of years, coalesce into the written Iliad that we now know? How do the struggles of the Iliadic hero illuminate both consciousness itself and the borders of culture? How does the poem both commemorate and critique its own heroes? How might the struggle over the city of Troy illuminate our own national propensities toward war without end?

One of the strangest elements of the Iliad is its depiction of Achilles, who marks out a queer distance from the norms of heroic culture. Standing at the turbulent center of the poem, amidst great violence, deceit, and godly meddling, is Achilles’ love for his companion Patroclus. In Reading the Iliad, we’ll ask, among other questions: how are we to understand the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus? What, in the poem and in Homeric Greek culture, is the boundary between the homosocial and the homoerotic? What links eros and destruction? What, in reading the Iliad, is the content of a queer critique?

Our primary focus will be on the Iliad itself, but we will also take up a few key texts in Iliadic criticism: Plato, Aristotle, Milman Parry and Albert Lord, and Simone Weil.

 

Course Schedule
Tuesday, 6:30-9:30pm
September 10 — October 01, 2019
4 weeks

$315.00*

Registration is required. Please click here.

*Three scholarship spaces are reserved in each course because we realize that not everyone can afford to pay the full fee for our courses. Students who cannot pay the full fee should email us at info@thebrooklyninstitute.com to learn about our scholarship options. We will not ask questions about your financial situation but we do ask that you use the system in good faith and consider the needs of other students and faculty members.

 

Image: Exekias, Achilles and Ajax Playing a Board Game, 540-530 BCE, Detail of Terracotta amphora, Height 2 feet. Musei Vaticani, Rome.

 

The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division is an independent, all-volunteer queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space hosted by The LGBT Community Center in Manhattan.

The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research is an organization of young scholars in New York City, founded in November 2011 by a few then-graduate students at Columbia University with a shared interest in pedagogy and genuinely interdisciplinary conversation. We teach classes all over the city, record a regular podcast, run a digital humanities initiative to preserve rare and out-of-print academic texts, and in general work frantically at any given time on a broad range of other academic and para-academic projects. We are a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.

 

Start: September 17, 2019 6:30 PM
End: September 17, 2019 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $315 for four-week course (see description)

September 24, 2019

Reading the Iliad

 

The Bureau is excited to partner with the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research to bring you:

Reading the Iliad

Instructors: Bruce King, Laura Slatkin
The Iliad stands at the start of most histories of western literature, even as it remains enduringly strange—often, it seems, at odds with the very tradition it has been taken to inaugurate. In this course, we will read closely the entirety of Homer’s “poem of force,” attempting to recapture both some of its strangeness and its continued relevance. We’ll focus, too, on the following themes: the hero and his commemoration; the relations of men and women, of men and men, of humans, gods, and animals; exile and rebellion; violence and the making of epic art; the recompenses and failures of culture itself. How did an oral tradition of heroic poetry, enacted by singing bards for hundreds of years, coalesce into the written Iliad that we now know? How do the struggles of the Iliadic hero illuminate both consciousness itself and the borders of culture? How does the poem both commemorate and critique its own heroes? How might the struggle over the city of Troy illuminate our own national propensities toward war without end?

One of the strangest elements of the Iliad is its depiction of Achilles, who marks out a queer distance from the norms of heroic culture. Standing at the turbulent center of the poem, amidst great violence, deceit, and godly meddling, is Achilles’ love for his companion Patroclus. In Reading the Iliad, we’ll ask, among other questions: how are we to understand the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus? What, in the poem and in Homeric Greek culture, is the boundary between the homosocial and the homoerotic? What links eros and destruction? What, in reading the Iliad, is the content of a queer critique?

Our primary focus will be on the Iliad itself, but we will also take up a few key texts in Iliadic criticism: Plato, Aristotle, Milman Parry and Albert Lord, and Simone Weil.

 

Course Schedule
Tuesday, 6:30-9:30pm
September 10 — October 01, 2019
4 weeks

$315.00*

Registration is required. Please click here.

*Three scholarship spaces are reserved in each course because we realize that not everyone can afford to pay the full fee for our courses. Students who cannot pay the full fee should email us at info@thebrooklyninstitute.com to learn about our scholarship options. We will not ask questions about your financial situation but we do ask that you use the system in good faith and consider the needs of other students and faculty members.

 

Image: Exekias, Achilles and Ajax Playing a Board Game, 540-530 BCE, Detail of Terracotta amphora, Height 2 feet. Musei Vaticani, Rome.

 

The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division is an independent, all-volunteer queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space hosted by The LGBT Community Center in Manhattan.

The Brooklyn Institute for Social Research is an organization of young scholars in New York City, founded in November 2011 by a few then-graduate students at Columbia University with a shared interest in pedagogy and genuinely interdisciplinary conversation. We teach classes all over the city, record a regular podcast, run a digital humanities initiative to preserve rare and out-of-print academic texts, and in general work frantically at any given time on a broad range of other academic and para-academic projects. We are a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization.

 

Start: September 24, 2019 6:30 PM
End: September 24, 2019 9:30 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $315 for four-week course (see description)

September 26, 2019

Edojah: Risking It All for Freedom

 

Edojah: Risking It All for Freedom is a play about Edafe, a gay man from Nigeria and his relationship with his grandmother was special. “There are several things that go unspoken between us, but in the silences, I feel that she gets me and believes in my ability. But if I flee Nigeria what will be the price I pay to save myself?” An African man’s journey to seek asylum in the United States.

 

 

Copies of Edojah: Risking It All for Freedom will be available for purchase at the Bureau. To reserve a copy please write to us at contact@bgsqd.com. Please support the Bureau by buying books from us. Thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start: September 26, 2019 7:00 PM
End: September 26, 2019 9:00 PM
Venue: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Address:
208 West 13th Street, Room 210, New York, NY, 10011, United States
Cost: $10 suggested donation to benefit the Bureau. No one turned away for lack of funds.